‘Bones’ becomes Coolum’s second prehistoric beast

Palmer Coolum Resort’s newest dinosaur ‘Bones’ will soon take up permanent residence near Café Parisien, located adjacent to the resort’s Golf Pro Shop.
Palmer Coolum Resort’s newest dinosaur ‘Bones’ will soon take up permanent residence near Café Parisien, located adjacent to the resort’s Golf Pro Shop.

Dinosaur number two has taken residence at Palmer Coolum Resort in the shape of a huge skeletal Omeisaurus.
Already nicknamed ‘Bones’ by resort management, the Jurassic giant will soon befriend Palmer Coolum Resort’s original dinosaur, the now world famous Tyrannosaurus Rex, ‘Jeff’.
Jeff established himself as a global personality during December’s Australian PGA Golf Championship where he played a starring role in many television shots and photographs; he even has his own Twitter account!
Bones on the other hand is a more retiring, less animated and all round quieter character, but that is unlikely to hinder his, or as the bone structure suggests, her, popularity.
At 18.5 metres long and over 7 metres high, Bones is impressive in stature and will be within Jeff’s gaze when she settles in at her new home near Cafe Parisien.
Palmer Coolum Resort General Manager Bill Schoch said he believed the Omeisaurus would prove just as popular as Jeff – well almost.
“Being a skeletal design this dinosaur is completely different to Jeff,” Mr Schoch said.
“At the moment she is at the Village Square but will soon be moved to a spot near Café Parisien.
“It is an accurate representation of many of the remains of this species that have been discovered and reconstructed in museums like Hong Kong and Beijing.
“Although ‘Bones’ doesn’t do some of the things that Jeff does, we still think she will be a very popular exhibit and is spectacular in her own right.
“Jeff is so popular throughout the world now perhaps it is better if Bones doesn’t try to steal his limelight anyway!”
A committed herbivore, Omeisaurus (pronounced oh-mee-sore-us) possessed an extraordinarily long neck and occupied China in the Middle Jurassic period.
Many partial remains of the Omeisaurus have been unearthed in China since the discovery of the first skeleton in 1939. The species was named after the sacred mountain Omeishan which is located near the discovery site.